Skip slideshow

Articles

Open access

Heat water and reptiles – do the hydro‐thermal properties of animals at the source location persist at the translocation site?

  •  11 April 2024

Graphical Abstract

Description unavailable

Translocation to future-suitable yet currently cooler locations is increasingly necessary to mitigate climate change effects in ectotherms such as reptiles. Our understanding of species’ ability to cope in these new environments lags demand, as does our understanding of hydro-thermal trade-offs for ectotherms. Here, we investigated behavioural responses to both temperature and relative humidity, rarely studied in tandem, in two latitudinally distinct lineages of a cryptic, burrow-dwelling endangered lizard. We found population differences in hydro-thermal behaviour among wild lineages that persisted in a trial translocation, indicating an absence of, or lag in plasticity for the translocated northern lineage that may affect translocation outcomes. More broadly our results indicate that local adaptation may play a role in the suitability of target lineages for proposed translocation environments and potentially the time required for lineages of any species moved across latitudes or climatic regions to acclimate under translocation.

Introduction of summer houses into semi‐natural habitats: impacts on ground‐nesting birds

  •  17 March 2024

Graphical Abstract

Description unavailable

We conducted bird surveys at 292 points within 71 sites with varying density of housing and associated infrastructure (tracks, decking, etc). Significant reductions in abundance with increasing housing density occurred in five (Golden Plover (Pluvialis apricaria), Black-tailed Godwit (Limosa limosa), Redshank (Tringa totanus), Whimbrel (Numenius phaeopus) and Meadow pipit (Anthus pratensis)) of the seven study species, while one species (Snipe (Gallinago gallinago)) showed no change and one (Redwing (Turdus iliacus)) increased. The differences in abundance between plots with no houses and plots with high house densities (>0.5 houses ha−1) ranged from 34 to 95%, despite the housing infrastructure covering only ~6% of the area of these plots.

Open access

Global conservation genomics of blue whales calls into question subspecies taxonomy and refines knowledge of population structure

  •  15 March 2024

Graphical Abstract

Description unavailable

Blue whales are the largest living animal and became endangered due to whaling. We found three major groupings of blue whales using high-resolution population genomics: the eastern Pacific, Indo-western Pacific, and Antarctic blue whales. Within these groupings, there was divergence between the eastern North and eastern South Pacific; between the eastern Indian Ocean, the western South Pacific, and the northern Indian Ocean; and no divergence within the Antarctic. The study reinforces that population structure needs to be well understood to conserve the diversity within species.

Open access

Variation in amphibian maturation rates influences population vulnerability to disease‐induced declines

  •  13 March 2024

Graphical Abstract

Description unavailable

We used a combination of demographic information and simulations to examine the role of variation in age to maturation in shaping population responses to the emerging pathogen chytrid fungus in the critically endangered corroboree frogs. Our results indicate that delayed maturation could be a previously underappreciated factor associated with increased risk of decline in disease-challenged populations and that earlier maturation could contribute to population persistence. Our results highlight the importance of examining variation in life history traits to understand population-level responses to novel threats.

Open access

Energetics‐based connectivity mapping reveals new conservation opportunities for the endangered tiger in Nepal

  •  5 March 2024

Graphical Abstract

Description unavailable

We applied novel methodology for mapping landscape connectivity for endangered tigers across the complex topography of Nepal. We found extensive potential habitats at higher elevations than the tiger's current range, suggesting opportunities for their range expansion. We underscore the crucial role that community-based management can have in facilitating that range expansion.

Open access

Disentangling the complexity of climate change and land‐management effects on wildlife communities

  •  17-18
  •  28 February 2024
No abstract is available for this article.

Evaluating the role of caretaker‐rated personality traits for reproductive outcomes in a highly endangered Hawaiian corvid

  •  1 February 2024

Graphical Abstract

Description unavailable

We evaluated caretaker-rated personality effects on conservation breeding outcomes in the ‘Alalā (Hawaiian Crow, Corvus hawaiiensis). We found that caretaker ratings were useful in identifying personality types in ‘Alalā and some (albeit weak) evidence that certain caretaker-rated personality traits (territoriality/aggressiveness and fearfulness) may predict variation in egg fertility. Moreover, we describe how the application of similar personality assessments may be used to enhance conservation breeding outcomes in other taxa, while underscoring the importance of overcoming methodological challenges surrounding the complexity of data collection and interpretation of among-rater consistency.

Open access

Perceptions and reality in fisher coexistence with aquatic predators in the Peruvian Amazon

  •  24 January 2024

Graphical Abstract

Description unavailable

The perceptions and reality of ‘human–wildlife conflict’ are infrequently compared, but this relationship is key to determining how negative outcomes can be mitigated. We trained fishers to complete fishing registers to record damage to nets by six large aquatic piscivores (two caiman, two dolphins, two otters) in Amazonian Peru, and compared these data to perceptions and attitudes. Perceptions of damage were closer to reality where predators were more common and fishers most familiar with them, while tolerance of predators was greater where resources had not been overexploited. Resource management may yield greater gains for stakeholders than other commonly prescribed forms of mitigation.

More articles
More articles
More articles
More articles

Latest news